Breckland Birder

Breckland Birder
Water Rail at Thompson Water, Norfolk Photo by Paul Newport

Saturday, 15 April 2017

'Nettlecreeper' back on patch.

The first significant rainfall for some time fell last night, this was followed by a day of long sunny spells, however, the wind was a cold, fresh north-westerly.
Recent wind directions have not been overly favourable for spring passage in recent days, these winds would block significant migrant arrivals, however, birds do still arrive, such is the urgency to get back and reaffirm their breeding territories.
Whitethroat or 'Nettlecreeper'
A migrant which I always await the arrival of is the Whitethroat and this morning I found a bird just outside the village of Ashill in Norfolk.  This beautiful Warbler generally arrives on the patch about this time, although my earliest record occurred on 12th April.  The Whitethroat is known colloquially in Norfolk as 'Nettlecreeper', an apt name for this bird which haunts briar patches and nettlebeds.


Dereham (Rush Meadow) 0930-1030
Bright conditions greeted me as I arrived at Rush Meadow.  Sheltered areas were pleasantly warm, however, the cold, fresh north-westerly was most noticeable in exposed areas.
Singing Willow Warbler in Hawthorn at Dereham, Norfolk 15th April
Two, possibly three Willow Warblers were the first birds heard upon my arrival with one singing male watched for some time in suitable breeding habitat comprising riverside Willows, Hawthorn, and a ground layer of scrubby habitat where it is likely the bird will choose to nest in. 
Over the nearby sewage treatment works, many Swallows and House Martins gathered to feed.
A short walk along the bank of the river produced singing Goldcrest and Chiffchaff whilst a diminutive Wren moved mouse-like through ground cover.
A single Little Egret was present in trees, and then on grazing land close to the river.

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