Breckland Birder

Breckland Birder
Water Rail at Thompson Water, Norfolk Photo by Paul Newport

Sunday, 25 January 2015

Thompson Common, Norfolk

What was particularly pleasing about this visit to Thompson Common today was hearing the number of species now singing in readiness for the forthcoming breeding season, along with this, I also observed some courtship behaviour between some Blue Tits.
I parked in the village of Thompson and walked towards the Peddars Way via the single track road, I then followed a lovely trail through damp, mature woodland carr habitat to as far as the open grassland section of the common.
From the outset, song was heard.  The first of many Marsh Tits was heard delivering its loud repeated "chip-chip-chip-chip" song.  As I walked through woodland a number of Nuthatches and Treecreepers were heard, this included a Treecreeper in song.
A movement caught my eye and above me, a Goshawk landed in top of a tree directly above me, however, as soon as it landed it flew off strongly again...no time to ready the camera sadly.
Nuthatch at Thompson Common 25/01/15.  Many seen today.
Nuthatch at Thompson Common 25/01/15.
Siskin at Thompson Common 25/01/15.  Good numbers in Alders
The woodland trail alongside a quite stream that leads to the open grassland supported further Nuthatches, Treecreepers, Marsh Tits, and 'drumming' Great Spotted Woodpecker.  At the meeting of woodland carr/grassland habitat by the kissing gate, a number of Siskins arrived to feed in some Alders.  Also here was Goldcrest, Robin, Blackbirds, Jay, and Great Tits, whilst to my right somewhere out of sight, a Red Fox was barking.
Walking back on myself through the woodland, I eventually arrived at Thompson Water.  Whilst on route, a Mistle Thrush was in song and a number of Redwings called. 
The surface of the water remains frozen with a thin film of ice.  Mute Swans and a Gadwall is all that I could see there.
The surrounding woodland and waterside scrub supported further Marsh Tits, Blue Tits, Great Tits, Coal Tits, a few Siskins, Nuthatch, Treecreeper, whilst in the dense reed cover a Water Rail gave a single burst of its loud squeal call.  A nice end to a productive morning.

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